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Coltraine, Amaryllis (Ammy)

First appears in Origin in Death, Salvation in Death (c. May 2060)[1] and Promises in Death (Spring 2060)[2]

Personal InformationEdit

  • General Description: Magnolia blossom in full bloom.[3]
  • DOB: c. 2027
  • Age: 33
  • Hair: Blond
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Address: Apartment 405, 525 West Twenty-third Street, New York City, New York
  • Relationships: July Coltraine (brother); unnamed parents
  • Occupation: Detective third grade NYPSD, Eighteenth squad (House 42)[4]

DescriptionEdit

  • A stupendously endowed blonde; she had a voice like melted butter and eyes of drowning blue.[5] She has a silky lock of melted butter hair and deep summer blue eyes.[6]
  • In Salvation in Death, Dallas described her as the Southern belle cop with the big rack.[7]
    • Detective Magnolia Blossom[8]
  • She was a slim, athletic built woman with eyes of deep blue. Her blond hair swung past her shoulders, a parted curtain for a lovely face.[9]
  • Her hands were nicely manicured.[10]
    • She always wore a ring on the middle finger of her right hand; a square-cut pink tourmaline, flanked by small green tourmaline baguettes on a silver band. Her parents gave her the ring on her twenty-first birthday. It was a reminder of who and where she'd come from.[11]

PersonalityEdit

  • She was smart, capable, organized, steady, and precise; a good cop who did the job and did not live it.[12] She was good with people.[13]
  • She was feminine, subtle, sexual, and liked pretty things.[14]
  • She was a thinker – she excelled in school and had no black marks or no shiny stars; she was careful.[15]
  • She liked to walk in the city, to see what was going on and be a part of it; she liked the night and walking at night; she wanted to learn the saxophone but she had no talent for it so she'd listen to Morris.[16]

HistoryEdit

  • She transferred to New York from Atlanta (Coltraine's YANNI) a few months ago (just under a year ago)[17] and, according to Morris, she had a serious relationship for over two-years in college. He also said she was seriously involved with someone else before she moved to New York but he never learned the man's name.[18]
  • She worked a robbery of an antique shop in Atlanta and spoke with the owner of the shop several times. His name was Alex Ricker.[19]
    • She narrowed it down to three suspects and, when she attempted to serve warrants, the suspects were gone; the missing antique store items were found in their homes. Within two days, the badly beaten bodies of the three men were found floating in the Chattahoochee River – chained together. Alex was alibied.[20]
    • Alex and Ammy became involved, as lovers, for nearly two years and kept the relationship quiet; they'd been separated for about a year when Coltraine was murdered and, according to Alex, they parted as friends.[21] Eve said Alex didn't, or wouldn't, give up his shady operations for her and she couldn't look the other way.[22]
    • Roarke said that Alex's lady ("his lady") realized he wasn't going to become fully legitimate. Because of that, she broke it off.[23]
    • IAB investigated Coltraine. About nine months before she transferred from Atlanta to New York, photos of Coltraine and Alex Ricker hand-holding and kissing landed on IAB's desk. Webster said they couldn't find any evidence of wrong-doing on either part and they bumped her down in priority.[24]
  • After Amaryllis and Alex split up, she returned the jewelry he had given her[25] because the jewelry mattered to her. And since they mattered to her, she couldn't keep them.[26]

Family HistoryEdit

  • Her parents and brother still live in Atlanta.[27]
  • She came from a good background, upper middle-class, single-marriage family.[28]

Homicide InformationEdit

  • TOD: 11:40pm (2340)[29]
  • She was stunned, mid-body in her apartment building stairwell, five floors below her home. There was no sign of struggle and no visible wounds but for the stunner burns on her throat.[30]
    • After she was stunned, she fell to the floor. She was brought back to consciousness with a stimulant before being murdered by her police-issue stunner pressed against her throat and fired.[31]
    • She carried both her standard issue weapon and her clutch piece when she went out.[32]
  • She was murdered by Cleo Grady under the direction of Max Ricker.[33]

Interesting FactsEdit

  • Makes home-baked fudge brownies - she bakes for relaxation.[34]
  • When asked if he's smitten with her, Morris asks, "Who wouldn't be?"[35]
    • In Salvation, Morris was given at least two dozen roses from a woman who is a "very good friend."[36] Eve speculated they were given by Coltraine.[37]
    • She thanked Morris with a gleam in her eyes that made it clear she was thanking him for a lot more than a crappy soy product.[38]
    • Morris gave Ammy roses and a green-eyed, silky, white-furred, droid cat; she named it Sachmo.[39]
  • After Eve notified him of Coltraine's murder, Morris said he had been falling in love with her.[40] They were planning to go away for a few days, to Graceland.[41] Throughout Promises, she was repeatedly called "Morris's lady" by several people.[42]
    • They had dinner together at Jaq's the night before she died.[43]
  • Eve said she never gave Amaryllis a chance. She was irritated that Morris was stuck on her but she thinks she would have liked her okay if she had given Ammy more of a chance.[44]
  • She had a habit of taking the stairs.[45]
  • She used a weasel, Stu Bollimer, who owns a pawnshop on Spring. As they're both from Georgia, she played the connection.[46] One of her recent cases involved a Chinatown robbery and Denny Su.[47]
  • The first thing Amaryllis bought herself when she came to New York was a small glass butterfly with its jeweled wings lifted - she said it always made her smile. Morris gave the butterfly to Eve.[48]

YANNIEdit

  • Origins
    • According to Origin in Death, Coltraine came to New York from Savannah, Georgia;[49] according to Promises in Death, she transferred from Atlanta, Georgia.[50] (return to section)


References Edit

  1. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 43
  2. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 6
  3. Origin in Death (ISBN 0-425-20426-X), p. 44
  4. Origin in Death (ISBN 0-425-20426-X), p. 43; Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 38, 88
  5. Origin in Death (ISBN 0-425-20426-X), p. 43
  6. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 155
  7. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 23
  8. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 155
  9. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 1, 2
  10. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 8
  11. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 18, 162
  12. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 20, 70
  13. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 47, 50, 70
  14. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 24, 70, 90
  15. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p.
  16. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 219
  17. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 80
  18. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 20, 70
  19. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 76, 77
  20. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 79, 80
  21. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 99, 100
  22. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 164
  23. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 204
  24. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 117-119, 153, 154
  25. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 118, 156, 162
  26. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 162
  27. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 35
  28. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 122, 162
  29. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 10
  30. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 2, 17
  31. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 29, 30, 34, 35
  32. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 12, 23, 34
  33. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 335-337, 339
  34. Innocent in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15401-0), p. 226
  35. Innocent in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15401-0), p. 226
  36. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), pp. 20, 21
  37. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 23
  38. Salvation in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15522-2), p. 155
  39. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 1, 2, 24, 314
  40. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 19
  41. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 20
  42. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 22, 35, 70, 263
  43. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 36, 37
  44. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 307
  45. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), pp. 1, 22
  46. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 43
  47. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 75
  48. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 341
  49. Origin in Death (ISBN 0-425-20426-X), p. 43
  50. Promises in Death (ISBN 978-0-399-15548-2), p. 80

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