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Lowell, Robert

Appears in Creation in Death; (March 1 – March 5, 2060 [Friday – Tuesday])[1]


Personal InformationEdit

DescriptionEdit

  • Pale, soft-looking skin with some lines but a nice smooth texture. He had no jowls and the face was rounded, his ears lying neatly, and on the small side.[3]
  • His voice was soft, quiet, and refined; like someone who was educated with money behind him. Trina said that he smelled good, a hint of rosemary with an undertone of vanilla.[4]
  • His eyes were slightly hooded; his mouth, a little thin on top; he was short-necked, so that his head sat low on his shoulders.[5]

PersonalityEdit

  • He considers himself a maestro in the art of death; the keeper of time; the bringer of destiny; he preferred women as his ‘partners’ in the ‘duet’.[6]
  • According to Peabody and Dallas, he’s a coward as he doesn’t confront his victims but uses guile and lies, the lure of money or advancement or the achievement of a personal goal.[7]
  • Cleanliness and sanitation are important to him.[8]
  • He prefers Italian operas.[9]
  • Under his alias of Hugh Klock, he was listed as cooperative and unilluminating; his name was in Gil Newkirk’s notes as having been questioned regarding The Groom’s murders.[10]

HistoryEdit

  • He described his stepmother as lovely, almost exquisite and, when she sang, she was glorious. She was a soprano with the range for allegra, lirica, and drammatica; he listened to her for hours.[11]
  • When Robert was around twenty, James Lowell had been married to Edwina Springs when he overheard Edwina talking to a young first lieutenant and making plans to run away together.[12]
  • The young lieutenant, afterward, was listed as AWOL and she hadn’t been back. Edwina’s body was found on the sidewalk; her hair had been cut off, and her face had been ripped up – she had been tortured.[13]
  • According to Tomas Pella, Robert’s grandfather (Robert the first), was a torturer and the marks on and condition of her body led him to believe they had tortured her after learning of her plans to leave her husband and run away with a young lieutenant.[14]
  • Pella said the younger Robert wept like a baby when he saw her under the sheet; he wept like a woman.[15]
  • Lowell said he and Edwina were soul mates. He had trouble controlling his impulses and had mood swings. His father institutionalized him briefly, over his grandfather’s objections. He said Edwina was patient and loving and helped him to remain calm or entertained.[16]
  • After he overheard her plans to run away, Lowell told his father and grandfather that she was a traitor and watched as his grandfather tortured Edwina. She lasted ninety-seven hours, forty-one minutes, and eight seconds.[17]

Criminal HistoryEdit

  • For him, death was a vocation. Killing was not merely an act, or a means to an end. It certainly was not an impulse of the moment or a path to gain and glory. Death was, in and of itself, the all.[18]
  • One of his tools was an antique switchblade (circa 1953) with a horn handle he’d purchased while touring Italy. He used a variety a tools from sharp, dull, cold, and heat; he always saved the face for last.[19]
  • Called The Groom in the media. It was nine years, two weeks, and three days since the first body attributed to The Groom was found. He murdered four women in fifteen days (between February 11th and February 26th of 2051).[20]
  • Ryan Feeney, Eve Dallas, Gil Newkirk, and Morris all three worked on the case the first time The Groom appeared in New York.[21] Feeney had been in charge of the first task force assigned to find and apprehend The Groom.[22]
  • He spends two to three weeks at his work, and then he stops. His signature has been identified in New York, in Wales, in Florida, in Romania, in Bolivia, and now again in New York.[23]
  • In Bolivia, at a costume ball at an opera house, he attempted to kidnap an LC but failed and had to select another victim, a waitress who worked for a caterer at the opera. He had dressed as Othello.[24]
  • The Sunshine Casino was where Lowell’s first victim in Florida was last seen at approximately 1:00 am.[25]

Homicide InformationEdit

  • MO: Stalks and selects his victims, then abducts them. He slowly tortures his victims, then cuts opens their wrists and lets them bleed to death. Once they are dead, he records the time they survived by carving hours, minutes, and seconds into their torsos. He washes their bodies carefully before disposing of them. He uses Fáilte linen and has upgraded from L'Essence products.[26]
  • Aliases
    • Edward Gaines [27]
    • Edward Nave (DOB: June 8, 1989)[28]
    • Cicero Edwards [29]
    • Stewart E. Pierpont (deceased wife, Carmen DeWinter) [30]
    • Edward Singer [31]
    • Hugh Klok [32]
  • Victims (during the police briefing, twenty-three women [in nine years, in four countries] were named as victims of his though more are believed to have been murdered).[33]
  • He abducts Ariel Greenfeld, tortures her and, as he still held her hostage, he disabled (tranq’d) and abducted Eve Dallas.[35] As Dallas had taken two stimulants (energy boosts) earlier in the day, the tranq was much less effective and she was able to use her clutch piece to disable him.[36]

Interesting FactsEdit

  • He required holidays – what he thought of as his dormant periods – where he would travel, explore, eat fine meals; he might ski or scuba dive.[37]
  • He drives a black sedan and drinks Earl Grey out of his grandmother’s Meissen tea set.[38]
  • Lowell has a box in the Grand Tier (private balcony boxes) of the Metropolitan Opera House and attended a performance of Rigoletto after he abducted Ariel.[39]
  • Trina, while she was wearing her hair as a brunette (Caramel Mocha with Starfish highlights) was targeted by The Groom; she said he seemed so nice and safe.[40]
  • Under his Cicero Edwards alias, he listed The Royal Opera House, in London, as his address.[41]
  • Under his Stewart E. Pierpont alias, he listed his addresses as an opera house in Monte Carlo, a concert hall in London, and Carnegie Hall in New York. Jessica Charters described Stewart E. Pierpont as a very odd duck.[42]
  • The sterling silver rings he placed on his victims’ fingers were purchased from Tiffany’s.[43]
  • Current address for Robert Lowell is the English National Opera in London.[44]
  • Under his Edward Singer alias, he visited the Manhattan Family Center and was taken through the facilities. Their drug count, after his visit was off.[45]
  • Under his Hugh Klok alias, he was listed as an antiques dealer; a droid stated that Mr. Klok had been away for two weeks and would return within the next day or two. He contacted Dallas to arrange a meeting as, according to the droid, he had injured himself in a fall – when she arrived, he disabled her.[46]
  • His home was a Stealth base during the Urbans. The minute Dallas walked in, all comms were useless.[47]
  • He acknowledged his crimes and told Dallas that he would be quietly ending his life within the next twenty-four hours as per his requested and granted self-termination contract (because his condition was terminal with no more than two years left). Neither the State nor Global will supersede any individual’s right to die; Eve asked Roarke to make Lowell’s self-termination clearance disappear – Roarke agreed.[48]


References Edit

  1. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 8, 269, 270
  2. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 137, 142
  3. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 177, 213
  4. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 179, 180
  5. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 213
  6. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 1, 2
  7. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 133
  8. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 141, 142
  9. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 287
  10. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 243
  11. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 291
  12. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 313, 314, 346
  13. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 314, 315
  14. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 314, 315
  15. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 315
  16. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 346
  17. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 347, 349
  18. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 1
  19. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 2, 3, 16
  20. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 12, 13, 17
  21. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 33
  22. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 40
  23. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 48
  24. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 201-203
  25. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 210
  26. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 16, 46, 47
  27. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 144
  28. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 154
  29. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 210
  30. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 280, 281
  31. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 316
  32. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 326, 329
  33. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 45, 48
  34. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 131
  35. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 145, 329
  36. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 332, 334
  37. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 2
  38. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 142, 144, 226
  39. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 149
  40. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 172-175, 178
  41. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 210, 211
  42. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 281, 286
  43. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 281, 282
  44. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 301
  45. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 316
  46. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 244, 326
  47. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), p. 330
  48. Creation in Death (ISBN 978-0-425-22102-0), pp. 343-345, 349

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